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On Equality And Differences

thefineyoungcapitalists:

Men and women will never be completely equal. Men will always excel at some things and Women will excel at others. The same can be said for genetic differences that define the human race.

What we need to make sure is that people aren’t defined into these roles, and people with ideas and skills can do what their best at for the benefit of all society. Link

I seem to get a lot of criticism on this post but I still don’t understand why. When I ask people they say I should downplay the role that genetics plays in a person’s development, then they curse at me, then ban me on twitter. I want to expand why they are wrong and why video games help to lower this genetic divide.

Even at infancy both men and women have different abilities when it comes to cognitive skills. For example boys as young as 5 month old showed better spatial skills than girl. We don’t know why this is, but we’ve shown it statistically. Link

This gender divide continues throughout life with men having a greater level of spatial awareness than women. It’s important to understand that while this is apparent when you analyze a group of men, and a group of woman, the skill difference between any individual man and any individual woman is far larger the difference between the groups. Just because your girlfriend is a superior shot at Halo does not make you the woman in the relationship

So why am I bringing this up, because in this specific case video games help to erase this divide. University of Toronto researchers have shown that this difference in spatial skills is largely eliminated when playing video games. Playing only 10 hours of Medal of Honor: Pacific Assault destroyed this gender divide. This effect persisted for months afterwards but is most prevalent in First Person Shooters. Link

Equality isn’t about lying to people about our difference, an average man without legs will run slower than a man with legs. Equality is about giving people the time, and the respect to live their dreams even if society thinks it’s impossible (Whoops totally forgot Oscar Pistorius killed his girlfriend, I’ll replace him with Aimee Mullins you can see her TED talk here). When people say that violent video game hurt equality, not only are they playing into gender stereotypes, but they are actively preventing women from developing the skills to make true equality happen.

In the end the reason for this project is not to tell people what they should do but to question what they’ve been told.

In June 2001, under a cloud-streaked sky, Rebecca Gomperts set out from the Dutch port of Scheveningen in a rented 110-foot ship bound for Ireland. Lashed to the deck was a shipping container, freshly painted light blue and stocked with packets of mifepristone (which used to be called RU-486) and misoprostol. The pills are given to women in the first trimester to induce a miscarriage. Medical abortion, as this procedure is called, had recently become available in the Netherlands. But use of misoprostol and mifepristone to end a pregnancy was illegal in Ireland, where abortion by any means remains against the law, with few exceptions.

Gomperts is a general-practice physician and activist. She first assisted with an abortion 20 years ago on a trip to Guinea, just before she finished medical school in Amsterdam. Three years later, Gomperts went to work as a ship’s doctor on a Greenpeace vessel. Landing in Mexico, she met a girl who was raising her younger siblings because her mother had died during a botched illegal abortion. When the ship traveled to Costa Rica and Panama, women told her about hardships they suffered because they didn’t have access to the procedure. “It was not part of my medical training to talk about illegal abortion and the public-health impact it has,” Gomperts told me this summer. “In those intense discussions with women, it really hit me.”

When she returned to the Netherlands, Gomperts decided she wanted to figure out how to help women like the ones she had met. She did some legal and medical research and concluded that in a Dutch-registered ship governed by Dutch law, she could sail into the harbor of a country where abortion is illegal, take women on board, bring them into international waters, give them the pills at sea and send them home to miscarry. Calling the effort Women on Waves, she chose Dublin as her first destination.

Ten women each gave Gomperts 10,000 Dutch guilders (about $5,500), part of the money needed to rent a boat and pay for a crew. But to comply with Dutch law, she also had to build a mobile abortion clinic. Tapping contacts she made a decade earlier, when she attended art school at night while studying medicine, she got in touch with Joep van Lieshout, a well-known Dutch artist, and persuaded him to design the clinic. They applied for funds from the national arts council and built it together inside the shipping container. When the transport ministry threatened to revoke the ship’s authorization because of the container on deck, van Lieshout faxed them a certificate decreeing the clinic a functional work of art, titled “a-portable.” The ship was allowed to sail, and van Lieshout later showed a mock-up of the clinic at the Venice Biennale.

As the boat sailed toward Dublin, Gomperts and her shipmates readied their store of pills and fielded calls from the press and emails from hundreds of Irish women seeking appointments. The onslaught of interest took them by surprise. So did a controversy that was starting to brew back home. Conservative politicians in the Netherlands denounced Gomperts for potentially breaking a law that required a special license for any doctor to provide an abortion after six and a half weeks of pregnancy. Gomperts had applied for it a few months earlier and received no reply. She set sail anyway, planning to perform abortions only up to six and a half weeks if the license did not come through.

When Gomperts’s ship docked in Dublin, she still didn’t have the license. Irish women’s groups were divided over what to do. Gomperts decided she couldn’t go ahead without their united support and told a group of reporters and protesters that she wouldn’t be able to give out a single pill. “This is just the first of many trips that we plan to make,” she said from the shore, wrapped in a blanket, a scene that is captured in “Vessel,” a documentary about her work that will be released this winter. Gomperts was accused of misleading women. A headline in The Telegraph in London read: “Abortion Boat Admits Dublin Voyage Was a Publicity Sham.”

Gomperts set sail again two years later, this time resolving to perform abortions only up to six and a half weeks. She went to Poland first and to Portugal in 2004. The Portuguese minister of defense sent two warships to stop the boat, then just 12 miles offshore, from entering national waters. No local boat could be found to ferry out the women who were waiting onshore. “In the beginning we were very pissed off, thinking the campaign was failing because the ship couldn’t get in,” one Portuguese activist says in “Vessel.” “But at a certain point, we realized that was the best thing that could ever happen. Because we had media coverage from everywhere.”

Without consulting her local allies, Gomperts changed strategy. She appeared on a Portuguese talk show, held up a pack of pills on-screen and explained exactly how women could induce an abortion at home — specifying the number of pills they needed to take, at intervals, and warning that they might feel pain. A Portuguese anti-abortion campaigner who was also on the show challenged the ship’s operation on legal grounds. “Excuse me,” Gomperts said. “I really think you should not talk about things that you don’t know anything about, O.K… . I know what I can do within the law.” Looking directly at him, she added, “Concerning pregnancy, you’re a man, you can walk away when your girlfriend is pregnant. I’m pregnant now, and I had an abortion when I was — a long time ago. And I’m very happy that I have the choice to continue my pregnancy how I want, and that I had the choice to end it when I needed it.” She pointed at the man. “You have never given birth, so you don’t know what it means to do that.”

Two and a half years later, Portugal legalized abortion. As word of Gomperts’s TV appearance spread, activists in other countries saw it as a breakthrough. Gomperts had communicated directly to women what was still, in many places, a well-kept secret: There were pills on the market with the power to end a pregnancy. Emails from women all over the world poured into Women on Waves, asking about the medication and how to get it. Gomperts wanted to help women “give themselves permission” to take the pills, as she puts it, with as little involvement by the government, or the medical profession, as possible. She realized that there was an easier way to do this than showing up in a port. She didn’t need a ship. She just needed the Internet.

Gomperts no longer works from a boat. Eight years ago she started Women on Web, a “telemedicine support service” for women around the world who are seeking medical abortions. She and a small staff share a one-room office in Amsterdam on a residential street, where red-and-pink flowers bloom on the balconies of brick buildings. Early in July, I went to visit the space, which has six workstations with computers, a few shelves and a filing cabinet with the sticker “Trust Women.” A large window opens onto a courtyard, where a Cupid fountain bubbles.

sirdef:

90% of art is confidence. i know it can be hard to feel confident if you’re an artist on tumblr, where there’s so many talented artists, especially when your art doesn’t get that many notes. but confidence has to be an internal thing, something completely separate from the recognition you get for your art. feeling confident about yourself and your art makes a world of difference, and honestly makes art more fun.

leseanthomas:

GAME. CHANGER.

SEOUL — Korean animation firm, Studio Mir has forged a 4-year contract with DreamWorks Animation spanning four animated TV series.

Each series is expected to be a 78-episode 2-D show.

Significantly, the two companies are set to co-develop and co-produce. Details of the financing and ultimate distribution were not disclosed.

“The contract between DreamWorks and Studio Mir is a landmark in that it is a partnership of equals,” said Yoo Jae-myung, founder and CEO of Mir.”

SOURCE: http://variety.com/2014/tv/news/koreas-studio-mir-inks-multi-series-deal-with-dreamworks-animation-1201293880/

I’ll be out of town starting tomorrow [well, it’s after midnight, so today]. I’ll be back late on the 6th of September.

Have a great week, everybody.

truyorkbity:

AvaLynn was attacked by another student on the school playground. We are fighting for answers and for greater supervision at school.

My friend Lacey Harris’s 5 year old daughter was brutalized by another child on the playground at school this week, in Pascagoula, Mississippi. Her face is swollen and bruised beyond recognition, and the only thing the school can tell her is that they “are investigating”

This sweet little 5 year old girl is terrified to return to school. She is in pain and she has been MAIMED. This needs IMMEDIATE media attention. The school and local news are ignoring the mother’s and loved ones’ cries for help. This family needs justice for what has been done to their poor little angel, and not just to be swept under the rug, as the school district is attempting to do. PLEASE shine some light on this situation and force school administration and news media to get some answers!

The mother has started a GoFundMe page to request help for paying medical bills and legal fees, as it looks as though she’s going to have to pursue this route in order to get any justice at all for her little girl. Please, please, share this link on your page. Even if people are unable to donate, please just help us get the word out on what is going on with this poor family.

This is really heartbroken for me and extremely hard to look at.

This is the link to Ava’s donation page.
Please donate and share and PRAY!
God bless you all!

http://www.gofundme.com/doid6w

(via guanyunchang)

scootinfrooti:

hey if you have google chrome and you have dyslexia or problems with reading comprehension, the dyslexie extension is really great and is also free in the chrome web store. it also has the option to make text larger or smaller, a+, do recommend

(via guanyunchang)

clothing adjustments that need to happen

talk-newty-to-me:

merlsemrys:

runningbox11:

• shirts actually designed for girls with larger chests
• plus size clothing ACTUALLY intended to accommodate plus size people not just scaled up littler clothing
• clothes for tall people that won’t ride up
• pants for people with no butts
• cute bras in bigger sizes
•the fashion industry’s understanding that there’s lots of body types and every body type deserves to feel good in the clothes they wear

pockets

pockets

(via guanyunchang)

"But women get unfair advantages in custody battles"

handaxe:

FALSE. Fathers who ask for sole custody are far more likely to get it. It’s just that they don’t ask, mostly women do. Men win custody over women even if they are ostensibly unfit. More and more, judges and parents rule in favor of 50/50 custody. In fact, in the past ten years, the men’s rights movement has been devastating to women seeking custody in court and women are awarded sole custody about half as many times as men.  

So find a new fucking myth. 

(via guanyunchang)